Tea performing arts, tea terminology and translation, promote tea studies and innovations. *Contact ,icetea8@gmail.com, Trad. and Simp. Chinese used. Blog since 6/23/2005
Name: Steven R. Jones; Link: http://teaarts.blogspot.com/
===
名字:瓊斯史迪芬Steven R. Jones, 網址: http://teaarts.blogspot.com/

3/30/2009

videographer


we are trying to get some video of the "The Confucius Institute at San Diego State University will hold its unveiling ceremony on March 26." if anyone has any please let the institute know thanks
CONTACT US
Confucius InstituteCollege of Arts and Letters
San Diego State University
5500 Campanile Drive
San Diego, CA 92182-6060
Office: AL-172
Phone: 619.594.4791
Fax: 619.594.4792
confucius@sdsu.edu

3/21/2009

The Confucius Institute (CI) at San Diego State University&Scholar Tea Site

MARCH 2009 As well as other cultural events we are honored to participate and will be presenting: a Tea Site, Theme-Scholar Tea. Tea Master Instructor Steven R. Jones and Tea Master Chang Li-Hsiang ( 張麗香), organizer Shirley Chu .
=========
Theme: Scholar Tea. When tea savoring swept though China, it became a wonderful substitute for wine. Tea has been a drink that awakens the body first, then the mind, and ultimately the human spirit. Savoring a bowl or cup of tea in solitude or among colleges has spawned inspiration often. Simple tea drinking is perhaps how these classic literati or scholars got their ideas. It is well known the “Four Arts(Treasures) 四藝 of the Scholar”. The scholars, scholarly civil servants, or literati of Imperial China, where all schooled in Confucianism known as the School of Literati.

In early China the term refers to the class of people that went through traditional Chinese education. There were sets of Chinese civil service examination, including Chinese literature and philosophy. Passing the exam was a requirement for many government position. These were the mandarins, and refered to those who held government positions. Classical Chinese tea, calligraphy, poetry, painting, and qin, were practiced and perfected by this social class.

Photos照片

The below diagram shows the relationship between the culture and the tea ware.




---Steven R. Jones, Mar 21, 2009


The Ancient Chinese Literati took pride in their writing instruments and there surroundings. Most of the literati came from the higher class of society, and were also known as collectors of art in the form of stone, wood, lacquer, ivory, horn, metal, jade figurines as well as their writings were put on scrolls and displayed as art. These items were set around the desk, room, walls and shelves; and these items were focus points and appreciated over a cup of tea, with the scholar’s mind always at work “thinking”. Also the act of brewing tea, admiring the beauty and craftsmanship of the brewing vessel that allows it to infuse into a magnificent liquid and pour in a perfect arc, and filling the air with wonderful scents, and flavors in all this inspired the scholar. Many scholar had a connection and passion for nature, so they would have a retreat in the mountains. Here an apprentice would make tea and the scholar would savor tea and let the mind wonder and drift through lore of life.


======2009 Ambassador Charles W. Hostler Lecture “China’s Development and China-US Relations”1:45pm-2:45pm Arts and Letters Auditorium 201, SDSU Thursday, March 26
Free Admission Brochure (.pdf) Parking (Structure 8)
Unveiling Ceremony Confucius Institute at SDSU 3:00pm Arts and Letters Auditorium 201, SDSU4:00pm Reception Thursday, March 26
RSVP Required


The Confucius Institute (CI) at San Diego State University was established in collaboration with the Office of Chinese Language International Council (Hanban). Hanban is committed to making Chinese language and cultural teaching resources and services available to the public and to the promotion of cultural diversity and harmony. Through academic partnership with Xiamen University, the CI at SDSU aims to strengthen educational and cultural cooperation between China and the United States. This partnership will serve to promote the development of Chinese language education in the greater San Diego region and Baja California as a whole, while continuing to foster historical understanding and cultural collaboration on both sides of the Pacific.
The CI at SDSU focuses especially on teacher training. By offering both on-site and online classes, while also utilizing the most advanced language teaching pedagogy and technology, the CI at SDSU aims to establish a public face and a central environment for Chinese teachers training in Southern California and Baja California and the greater San Diego region as a whole.
Mission and Goals
To offer teacher-training and to provide a pool of well-qualified and well-trained Chinese language teachers to meet the language and culture learning demands of the greater San Diego region
To assist local schools with the development of Chinese language programs and to provide them with teaching resources
To provide a series of seminars and courses in language and culture with San Diego Chinese Historical Museum and local arts and cultural communities
To provide a series of seminars and workshops in economic and market updates for business executives, collaborating with the SDWTC, ABA and local business communities
To provide information and consultative services for people who are interested in conducting cultural, economic and business activities with China
The CI Headquarter- Hanban
Hanban is the executive body of the Chinese Language Council International, a non-governmental and non-profit organization affiliated with the Ministry of Education of China. Hanban is committed to making the Chinese language and culture teaching resources and services available to the world, to meeting the demands of overseas Chinese learners to the utmost, to contributing to the formation of a world of cultural diversity and harmony.
SDSU and Confucius Institute
The Confucius Institute (CI) at San Diego State University is established in collaboration with Hanban. Housed in the College of Arts and Letters, the purposes of the CI at SDSU are to strengthen educational cooperation between China and the United States, and to promote the development of Chinese language education at the primary, secondary and tertiary levels as well as at the community schools. The CI at SDSU focuses especially on teacher training. By offering both on-site and online classes while utilizing the most advanced language teaching pedagogy and technology, the CI at SDSU aims to establish a public face and a central environment for Chinese teachers training in Southern California and Baja California, especially in greater San Diego region.
Our Partner- Xiamen University
Like every Confucius Institute, the CI at SDSU partners with one of the elite Chinese universities, Xiamen University. Founded in 1921, Xiamen University is a distinguished national research university located in Xiamen, Fujian Province, China. It is the first university founded by overseas Chinese. By the end of 2008, Xiamen University has established 9 CIs by partnering with universities and institutions throughout the world. The CI at SDSU is its 10th Confucius Institute and the first CI Xiamen University established in the United States.

CONTACT US
Confucius InstituteCollege of Arts and LettersSan Diego State University5500 Campanile DriveSan Diego, CA 92182-6060
Office: AL-172 (map)Phone: 619.594.4791Fax: 619.594.4792confucius@sdsu.edu

http://confucius.sdsu.edu/index.html

http://www.xmu.edu.cn/english/

http://english.hanban.edu.cn/index.php?language=en


3/20/2009

Pacific Ridge School, Carlsbad-tea lecture&demo



Photos照片

Mar 23, 2009, 12:00-3:00pm:
Topic: 茶具名稱術語等之應用與茶文化-唐,宋,明,清-朝代 ...和現在
Chinese Tea Ware and Tea Culture, Tang, Song, Ming, Ching Dynasties, and now!

Lecture and demonstration(both in English and Chinese) Presented by Certified Tea Arts Master Instructor Steven R. Jones and Certified Tea Arts Master Chang, Li-Hsiang ( 張麗香),
for the Chinese classes at Pacific Ridge School, organizer Shirley Chu .

A special school, with special global engagements, one of their programs is Chinese. As students grow from local citizens to world travelers to world citizens, they will grow comfortable with differences in other cultures in the world. Students, faculty and staff will study Mandarin Chinese as a school twice a week. Students will have the opportunity to travel to the Yangtze River Valley in China.

Since the first days of tea, China has always been working on growing, producing, and making to drink a better tea.
三大茶法–The Three Tea Methods
----------------------------------------
煮 - 點 - 泡
唐代 – Tang Dynasty
煮茶法 – Boiling Tea Method
宋代 – Song Dynasty
點茶法 – Whisking Tea Method
明代 – Ming Dynasty
泡茶法 – Brewing Tea Method
===after Ming the improved the same method==========

清代 – Qing Dynasty (Ching)
功夫茶 – Gongfu Tea, making tea with skill, to bring out the best of the tea’s character and essence.
近代 – Modern Times
To brew the best we can, with the motive simplicity.

3/10/09, revision Mar 15, 2009

3/16/2009

North America Taiwanese Women's Association- Greater San Diego Chapter 3rd Annual Meeting&Arts and Life Wu-Wo Tea Ceremony



Photos照片

Presented by:
北美洲臺灣婦女會聖地牙哥
North America Taiwanese Women's Association- Greater San Diego Chapter

Greater San Diego Chapter , Pres. Carol
San Diego Chapter 3rd Annual Meeting, March 21, 2009
Special Thanks to: Gina and her beautiful Garden

Date: (Saturday), Mar 21, 2009
Here is the program of the Garden Gathering on March 21.
Time:
9:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. Registration
10:00 a.m. - 10: 05 a.m. Welcome
10:05 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. Arts & Life - Gina
10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. 無我Wu-Wo Lecture and demonstration - Steven & Li-Hsiang
11:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Election, New President
12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. Lunch
1:00 p.m. - 1: 45 p.m. Song of Spring -Esther and Wilma
1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. Arts and Life Wu-Wo Tea Ceremony
茶會名稱 - 藝術與生活無我茶會
Tea Gathering Name: Arts and Life Wu-Wo Tea Ceremony
2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Workshop - Fruit Tea
3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Garden tour
***
無我茶會公告事項
Wu-Wo Tea Ceremony Public Announcement
Introduction discussion on Wu-Wo and a demonstration of the Tea Ceremony and then we will have a Wu-Wo Tea Ceremony.
Location: Gina’s Garden San Diego, California
Organizers for Tea Ceremony : Steven R. Jones, Chang Li-Hsiang, and North America Taiwanese Women's Association, Pres. Carol
Special Thanks to: Gina and her beautiful Garden
This Tea Gathering is to promote international tea culture and to utilize the skills to always improve our tea brewing.
Presented by Certified Tea Arts Master Instructor Steven R. Jones and Certified Tea Arts Master Chang, Li-Hsiang ( 張麗香)

--steven (3/15/2009)

3/13/2009

台北陸羽茶藝中心

陸羽茶藝中心

茶之專業英語
編號 :ba-o
詢價說明 :請洽陸羽門市
聯絡人姓名1 :陸羽茶藝中心門市
聯絡人電話1 :02-2331-6636
聯絡人傳真1 :02-2389-7786
茶學研討會-----茶之專業英語
開課日期------- 2009/04/22
每週上課日期---每週三
上課時段--------晚上7:00~9:00
課程簡介下載
--------------
茶之專業英語下載

3/10/2009

Chinese culture, tea, and philosophy

Tea can be more than a drink; it can be a way of conveying philosophical concepts, or a device to create a ceremony around or to honor something. In China, what started out as a food and medicine, for common people, then used by monks to help them study, later to become a skillfully processed item available for the royal families and upper class. To the simple Daoist, tea is natural, simple, and for drinking. So, for Chinese, tea is not just a beverage, it is a combination of Chinese Daoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism.
Tea and Daoism
Daoism is a philosophy/religion. In Chinese, Dao literally means path or way, and also meaning principle. Daoism means the essence of the universe and living with natural way of things. Tea Dao is a way of living with tea and becoming part of the person’s life habits; I have a saying "Tea is our Bridge". Now in Japan the adopted word Dao and referred it to something has a form/custom/ceremony with strict movements and some skill sets, "Chado". The Japanese, Korean, and Chinese Tea Dao can be seen as very different or parallels can been seen also. Chinese version Tea Dao concept is shown in the Chinese lifestyle to enjoy tasting tea and to blend into the eternal universe.
Tea and Confucianism
It emphasizes the formality, the behavior that people must conduct and ceremony between almost everything. The principles of Confucianism include social harmony and balance. Its complex structure of etiquette also influenced the creation of the tea etiquette and tea ceremony in China.
Tea and Buddhism
Buddhism entered China from Old Northern India. Drinking tea does not violate any Buddhist rules. Moreover, drinking tea help monks to meditate by keeping them awake. A side note, years ago many good quality teas have there roots from famous Buddhist temples that planted and nurtured tea trees with great with great skill and care.
---steven(03/09/09)

3/05/2009

Tulipomania and Puerhmania

What about "tulipomania" and puerh 1999-2007 the Puerh Boom, then the bubble pops. Sounded great buy bricks of black gold and make money. It works great until the greed over takes, and there's no time for sound thinking; because you gotta buy before the price goes up more or the puerhs are sold-out. This is not a new story. Just look now at the housing/stock market. But a Masterpiece Puerh will always be a Masterpiece Puerh. And now prices are back down to preboom prices, and the new puerhs are getting better do to production and aging skills. And still wild or semi-wild puerhs are becoming scarce and their prices will continue to increase slowly. Buy Puerh because you like drinking it. I personally have Puerhs in Taiwan, cozy aging. But if you plan on doing your own aging do you homework first. This bubble mostly hurt the ones that bought in 2007, but so, let it ride(age), and drink some. The biggest problem was 2006-2007 there were "not all but"many low quality teas produced and sold as Puerhs, so aging is not going to make gold out of crap. The bright side is if you bought Puerh in 2006, chances are it was harvested in pre-2005 that tea has a great chance of being OK quality harvest. Another good note is if you buy from a experienced source that goes to Yuunan and knows you he is dealing with very well, during those years he still would have been getting good quality puerh, but it would have cost more. Puerh is a very difficult to identify, and to go in a new puerh shop and just ask a few questions and walk out with what you wanted, or going through the internet with a new company or some tea website you just read about, forget it. there are no set standards yet, but we are working at the college in china "Tenfu Tea College", to get a standard language in Chinese and English, as well as a standard for units and degrees of processing standards, many puerh makers have their own ways and it shows up in the packaging and labeling, like batch numbers and numbers to ID the product, year, and recipe, sometimes I even have to drink the tea just to find out if it is a ripe/dark or raw/light/green puerh., because many packages don't put it on or the labels either, and I can read a little Chinese to search for the words , but they are not to be found often. I also work people that can read Chinese well including masters, anyway what I am saying is you gotta do just like the rest of us know your local tea shop works and management, and have puerh tea partys or tasting events at your tea shops, if they have any events, or find some people and get them interested in tea or find some tea, (puerh drinkers). Asian areas in American towns are good for finding puerhs, but that doesn't mean it is good puerh, what is needed is that the shop bosses and/or owners go to Asian or are very familiar with THERE SUPPLIERS! Just one last thing there are some great websites to buy puerh. Sorry no ads here.

http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China_Business/IF26Cb01.html

tulipomania http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tulip_mania

3/01/2009

The Two Classifications of Puerh Tea & Wu-Wo Tea Ceremony Demonstration at Infusions of Tea

Ron and Emilie of
Infusions of Tea, Teashop
8750 Genesee Ave., Suite 258
San Diego, CA 92122
(858) 450-6500
http://www.infusionsoftea.com/



Discussion on:
The Two Classifications of Puer Tea.
Post Fermentation Tea Process.
Discussion on the way to recognize different Puer varieties (color, aroma, and taste).
How to store Puer Teas.
If good quality tea leaves with correct processing is obtained a puerh tea has the potential of becoming better through satisfactory aging parameters.
Green Puer Tea: tea total sum aging of five to seven years, (including factory, teashop, and private collector storage time), can be a fine tea.
Dark Puer Tea: tea total sum aging one to three years, (including factory, teashop, and private collector, storage), can be a fine tea.

***Green Puer:
tea harvest- fixation - rolling – compressing or loose shaping – drying - aging - packaging
(should age some, up to 30 years is sufficient and can become a masterpiece tea)

Post Fermentation Tea Processing
***Dark Puer:
tea harvest- fixation - rolling – piling(microbe fermentation) – compressing or loose shaping - drying-some aging(under one year) - packaging
(can age some, up to 15 years is sufficient and can become a masterpiece tea)


Notes-
Aging Puers -- fresh air circulation, clean environment, clean puerhs, and in a place tolerable with conditions we would want to live in. Other important concerns are warm/hot temperatures 80’~90’F and humidity 60~80’ relative humidity (RH%), both promotes post fermentation aging of Puer Teas but do not spray water or wrap in airproof containers the water will cause molds and airproofing will stop fermentation . If humidity or temperature is lower, puerh will still age, just slower.

Aging Puer teas, open air [exchange of gases + tea = post oxidation]
Also a Wu-Wo Tea Ceremony Demonstration.
Presented by Certified Tea Arts Master Instructor Steven R. Jones and Certified Tea Arts Master Chang, Li-Hsiang ( 張麗香)

Wu-Wo Tea Ceremony is a simple tea setting. A teapot, tea pitcher,thermos, tea cloth, sitting mat, cups, and tea tray.
http://www.answers.com/topic/wu-wo-tea-ceremony
Wu-Wo Tea Ceremony (無我茶會), Founder Tsai, Rong Tsang (蔡榮章)
And written by Steven R. Jones Taipei, June 16, 2005 (reprint)